Ultimate Encounter
By Bill Barry

Pocket Books 205 pages, paperback

N.Y., 1978

For those who saw the recent film "A Fire In The Sky" and who wondered how much of it was true and how much of it was fiction, this book is recommended.  It is the true account of the November, 1975, abduction of woodcutter Travis Walton by a UFO.  This happened in Arizona, near Snowflake, a small Mormon community. Walton was returning from work in a truck accompanied by six co-workers. They saw a UFO hovering above the ground.  Walton was bold enough to get out of the truck and under the UFO.  He was hit by a beam of light.  His companions fled the scene, scared for their lives.  When they returned, there was no trace of Walton.  Several days later, Walton returned; he could only remember a few hours of his several days' missing time.  Walton and his companions have been given several polygraph tests.  In most case they have passed.  Various factors can cause a person telling the truth to flunk a lie-detector test.  Stress and ambivalent or misleading questions probably caused Walton to flunk a test given by "The National Enquirer" tabloid.  All of the various hoax theories are explored in the book.  On of the six companions of Walton later tried to retract his story, but it is revealed in the book that he was offered ten thousand dollars to say it was a hoax.  It is not known who offered the money.  It was not taken.
The time Walton spent aboard the UFO is a matter of speculation.  He remembers only a few hours of what was probably a several day event.  Curiously enough, he remembers seeing three human-like beings on the UFO.  This was omitted in the film version.  The film merely depicted the small, large eyed aliens which are familiar to readers of UFO literature.  Were the humans Walton observed aliens or is there a secret cooperation going on between aliens and humans?  There is no definite answer.  Since there is no real physical evidence of the event, how much of it is psychological or a distorted perception of a real event? We may never know.

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